Sunday, 25 October 2015

OTMT Presents: Must-see Mongol Movies



Mongolian entertainment is traditionally centered around the nomadic way of life, for example folk music, horse racing and the fortune telling "shagai" bones. However since the 1960’s there has been a steady increase in  Mongolian orientated and produced films. These, along with national televised comedy theatre productions, are a popular example of modernizing entertainment industry within Mongolia.

Our top 3 recommendations to inspire your travels:

 

 1.       The Cave of the Yellow Dog (2005) Directed by Byambasuren Davaa


  A beautiful story of a young nomad girl who finds a stray dog inside a cave; however after taking him home finds that her parents won’t accept it. Only after the dog dramatically saves the family is it then allowed to start a new life with them on the move. 

The film is set in Arkhangai province in Central Mongolia, not far from the volcanic area where the actual cave of the yellow dog is located near to Terkhiin Tsagaan Nuur, the White Lake.



  
2.      The Story of the WeepingCamel (2003) Directed by Byambasuren & Luigi


 
An adorable camel colt is born into the family herd but is rejected by its mother. With an urgent need to reconnect the pair, the family embark on a journey to find a traditional musician to help them.
This film grew to become well known and was even nominated for an Oscar in addition to seven other nominations and 11 wins in various international film awards; a true testament to the beautiful narrative. 



 
3.      Genghis: The Legend of the Ten (2012) 
Directed by D. Jolbayar & U. Shagadsuren   


 Although most Mongolian films appeared to be centered on natural beauty and the trials of life, modern directors are starting to take a more Hollywood style twist. True to historical fact, this film is based on a 10 soldier unit, known as “aravt” in Mongolian. The troops are sent by Genghis Khan to find a special doctor; during their mission they face many trials including finding an abandoned baby and fighting off an enemy horde. With many Mongolian idioms, emotional sacrifices and a full Mongolian cast, ‘The Legend of the Ten’ makes for a stunningly immersive film. 




International appearances:
        
Marco Polo
Released in 2014 as part of a Netflix TV series, Marco Polo is based on the historical merchant’s tales. Concentrating on his adventures in Kublai Khan's court in 13th century China, the show is packed with “greed, betrayal, sexual intrigue and rivalry”.

Despite the exquisite costume design and fantastic Mongolian music, the series should be taken with a pinch of salt, mainly due to lack of genuine Mongolian actors and language. In addition, in order to dramatize the show, a lot of historical facts have been forgone. Nonetheless a very worthwhile watch!


 
The Great Match/ La Gran Final 
An adventure of three communities in the world’s most far flung places, all of whom are determined to watch the football final in Japan of the 2002 World Cup between Germany and Brazil. One of the three locations is set in Western Mongolia close to Kazakhstan; similarities are found in the likeness of both ethnic groups. It has been brilliantly researched and with the use of authentic locations, colloquial languages and beautiful cinematography, the film offers a light-hearted watch.

1 comment:

  1. Nice blog. I never knew that Mongolia can be so amazing to travel. I would love to visit this amazing place. People who are really concerned about their travelling experiences may take help from the detailed road maps to plan them well. Suppose if you are planning to visit Spain then you must have Spain Road Map along with you.

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